Greenbrier County students Bash the Trash at Carnegie Hall

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Greenbrier County students in grade K-5 traveled to Carnegie Hall in Lewisburg Nov. 2-6 to explore the three S’s (Science, Sound & Sustainability) along with the three R’s (Reduce, Reuse & Recycle). Students were on the edge of their seats as they enjoyed a lively performance while learning about the art and science of reusing discarded objects to make musical instruments.
Bash the Trash builds, performs and educates with musical instruments made from reused and re-purposed materials. Based in New York City, Bash the Trash scientists/musicians combine science, music and environmental awareness through its performances, programs and social initiatives, always focusing on how art and science work together.
“These kids will bring the next generation of ideas for dealing with the environmental issues we face. They will help discover new ways to take the things that we use and turn them into resources,” states Bash the Trash Co-Founder & Co-Executive Director, John Bertles. “Through Bash the Trash, we hope to help readjust ideas and impressions about the things that we use every day and demonstrate how these items can be used creatively. There’s a real environmental and economic benefit to this evolving mindset,” he continued.
As a certified Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, John Bertles also presented The Sound of Science: Connecting STEM to the Arts, a workshop for Greenbrier County teachers on Monday evening. This professional development workshop explored the deep and broad connections between science and the arts.
“We have really enjoyed being here at Carnegie Hall and performing for Greenbrier County’s students. It seems like everyone in West Virginia knows someone who plays or builds musical instruments. Music is such an integral part of this community – it’s just like coming home,” concludes Bertles.
Greenbrier County Schools has partnered with Carnegie Hall for over two decades to engage students in a rich variety of live performances through Spotlight on Schools. Bash the Trash was presented with financial assistance from the WV Division of Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the WV Commission on the Arts.

 

Instruments made from reused materials take on new life on Carnegie Hall’s stage during four days of Spotlight on Schools presentations with Bash the Trash. An estimated 2,200 Greenbrier County students in grade K-5 participated in this science-based environmental arts education program.
Instruments made from reused materials take on new life on Carnegie Hall’s stage during four days of Spotlight on Schools presentations with Bash the Trash. An estimated 2,200 Greenbrier County students in grade K-5 participated in this science-based environmental arts education program.