DSLCC Massage Therapy students learn techniques at VMI

Gloria Lawrence (far right), head of the Massage Therapy program at Dabney S. Lancaster Community College, demonstrates proper techniques to several of the students in her fall course during a clinical session in the Department of Sports Medicine at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington. “At VMI, cadets are treated in accordance with Orthopedic massage protocol to address deactivation of trigger points, reduction of adaptive load (biochemical, biomechanical) and/or enhancement of lymphatic and venous drainage to restore range of motion and enhance athletic performance,” says Lawrence. “During the Spring 2015 semester, students will be continuing with clinical rotations at the Duke Cancer Center in Fishersville.” Lawrence, who recently earned a national certification as a Natural Health Practitioner, has designed and developed the two-semester program to provide each student with experiential off-campus clinics for the most expansive skill-set training. “This program is uniquely different from all other programs offered in Virginia,” notes Lawrence. “The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics continues to project a 20-23 percent demand. At DSLCC we are committed to changing lives by changing futures, one student at a time.” Students looking on are, from left: Doris Balser of Clifton Forge, AdriAnne Reyns of Covington, Cheyenne Adams of Buena Vista and Christa Thomas of Covington.  Clinicals for the College’s program include hours at a wide variety of settings, such as retirement centers, hospitals, and sports-related venues, only a few of the many options for employment after completion of the program. For information regarding Fall 2015 enrollment, please contact Lawrence at 540-461-3447.
Gloria Lawrence (far right), head of the Massage Therapy program at Dabney S. Lancaster Community College, demonstrates proper techniques to several of the students in her fall course during a clinical session in the Department of Sports Medicine at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington. “At VMI, cadets are treated in accordance with Orthopedic massage protocol to address deactivation of trigger points, reduction of adaptive load (biochemical, biomechanical) and/or enhancement of lymphatic and venous drainage to restore range of motion and enhance athletic performance,” says Lawrence. “During the Spring 2015 semester, students will be continuing with clinical rotations at the Duke Cancer Center in Fishersville.” Lawrence, who recently earned a national certification as a Natural Health Practitioner, has designed and developed the two-semester program to provide each student with experiential off-campus clinics for the most expansive skill-set training. “This program is uniquely different from all other programs offered in Virginia,” notes Lawrence. “The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics continues to project a 20-23 percent demand. At DSLCC we are committed to changing lives by changing futures, one student at a time.” Students looking on are, from left: Doris Balser of Clifton Forge, AdriAnne Reyns of Covington, Cheyenne Adams of Buena Vista and Christa Thomas of Covington. Clinicals for the College’s program include hours at a wide variety of settings, such as retirement centers, hospitals, and sports-related venues, only a few of the many options for employment after completion of the program. For information regarding Fall 2015 enrollment, please contact Lawrence at 540-461-3447.

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