Published On: Fri, Mar 7th, 2014

Greenbrier County receives $33,120 in grant funds

Representatives from three Greenbrier County agencies were presented with grant funds by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin in a ceremony held in the Capitol reception room in Charleston on Mar. 5.

On hand as recipient for a $12,470 grant from the Records Management and Preservation Board Funds was Greenbrier County Clerk Robin Loudermilk. Those funds will be used for scanning of Clerk’s documents and rebinding of records books. This is the second year that the Clerk’s office has received grant funds through the Records Management and Preservation Board. It is part of the Clerk’s ongoing efforts to preserve the important documents maintained in the County Clerks Offices and ensure their availability for future use.

Representing the Ronceverte Historic Landmarks Commission were David Smith, Mayor of Ronceverte, and Doug Hylton who accepted $13,650 from the Archives and History Commission to assist with the Ronceverte Brick Paver Study. This includes an engineering study on historic Pocahontas Avenue between Pine Street and Locust Street. Project will look to have an assessment done to the street, determine what is necessary to bring the street back to full structural integrity, and to obtain a cost estimate on needed repairs.

Doug Hylton as President of the Greenbrier County Historic Landmarks Commission also received $7,000 for the Greenbrier County Historic Assets Phase V Survey project. This is an ongoing project to survey and identify historic properties within Greenbrier County. The survey will focus on eastern Greenbrier County south of I-64 in the areas surrounding White Sulphur Springs, Organ Cave, and moving westward in the southern portion of the county. The project will focus on areas not already having existing historic districts. Ronceverte, Lewisburg and Alderson already have existing historic districts so it will focus more in the rural areas around those communities. The HLC hopes to have all survey materials made available in the Clerk’s office where property owners may research the historic background on properties of interest.

 

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